Research bites

A series of snippets from our research on young people and their engagement in arts and culture.

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No.2


72% of young people living in Inner London have visited an arts exhibition in the past year (either at school or in their free time) compared to 57% of those living in Outer London.

With the exception of Cinema, attendance of cultural events and venues is higher among young people living in Inner London boroughs compared to those living in Outer London. This is perhaps unsurprising, given that the major cultural institutions tend to be clustered in the city centre.

Interestingly, schools do not appear to be levelling the difference by borough - if anything, the disparity in engagement between young people in Inner and Outer London is larger for those who are still at school. This echoes what we already know anecdotally, that distance makes it more difficult for schools in Outer London and cultural organisations to build active relationships.

Although young people generally engage less with arts and culture as they leave school, there is less of a difference between those who live in Inner and Outer London past the age of 16. This could potentially amount to more choice about how to structure their spare time and freedom / confidence to move around the city.

Source: Taken from 'Cultural Engagement by Young Londoners: An Introduction to key trends, drivers and challenges' our survey of young Londoners, investigating patterns of engagement of young Londoners aged 11-25 with cultural opportunities and reflecting on factors that may be influencing them.

Base: 1664 young people living in London aged 11-25; nationally representative sample by gender, age, social grade and borough.


No.1

44% of young people who are NEET have been to the Theatre in the past year compared to 69% of young people who are in education.

Looking at the flipside of this statistic, more than half of young people who are Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) have not been to the theatre in the past year compared to just under one third of young people in education. This is a significant difference which is not only reflected in theatre but across a range of cultural activities.

There are a number of reasons behind this. NEET young people are no longer at school and therefore don’t engage in cultural activities as part of their school day; they may also be from less privileged backgrounds and therefore less likely to have been encouraged by parents to engage; they may not be making social connections through work or training that might lead to greater cultural engagement; some may have personal circumstances which directly impact on their ability to engage (e.g. young carers, refugees).

Although, encouragingly, recent statistics from Local Authorities across England suggest that the number of NEET young people is currently at an all-time low, this group and devising a suitable ways for them to access the city’s cultural offer remains a challenge.


Source: Taken from 'Cultural Engagement by Young Londoners: An Introduction to key trends, drivers and challenges' our survey of young Londoners, investigating patterns of engagement of young Londoners aged 11-25 with cultural opportunities and reflecting on factors that may be influencing them.

Base: 1664 young people living in London aged 11-25; nationally representative sample by gender, age, social grade and borough.